Webcast: Problem determination for Java EE servers – WAS vs. JBoss and Tomcat


Last week we recorded our first webcast and covered a very difficult topic – troubleshooting Java EE server environment. The reason we made it the subject of our first webcast is that most people do not know how hard it is to make things work reliably and quickly perform problem isolation in production environment. We all take it for granted.  We all think that “somebody” will take care of our server and it will work with no downtime.. Ever. But s&%t happens. And it happens all the time. And that is why you need solid plan to tackle production issues. Having smart tools to help you along the way makes a big difference. That is precisely what we have discussed in this 20 minutes webcast, albeit at the relatively high level. I will record a detailed demo of all of the tools we have discussed in the next few weeks, but after watching this video you will be able to understand some important differences between WebSphere Application Server and JBoss and Tomcat in the areas of JVM tuning and garbage collection, log analysis, request tracking, server health management, memory dump analysis, etc.

 



Categories: Technology

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3 replies

  1. There is no such thing as JBoss server. WildFly is the JEE6 open source application platform. Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform is the open source application platform available via subscription. Why the lack of accuracy?

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  1. IBM Support Assistant and Monitoring and Diagnostic tools for Java « WhyWebSphere.com Blog

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